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  • Step forward in protecting the high seas, despite competing interests

    The high seas — also called international waters — comprise 64% of the world’s oceans and 45% of the earth’s surface. They are shared by the world but governed by no one country. That means that the incredible biodiversity of the high seas, from seaweeds to fish to sharks, is not currently protected.

  • Measuring mercury levels in the ocean: A scientist at sea on the Research Vessel Endeavor

    By Colin Thackray, Nereus Fellow at Harvard University

    The oceans are very expansive. Their enormous size and distance from where people stay long term presents a challenge for scientists monitoring the oceans. Unlike many atmospheric measurements for meteorology which we can make just outside of cities, often at airports, to get good measurements for ocean science, a journey on the sea is often required. Around the world, there are many ships designed or outfitted specifically for bringing scientists to the ocean – so called Research Vessels (RVs).

  • The UN Oceans Conference and Sustainable Development Goals: Are partnerships providing the way forward?

    The global oceans provide hundreds of millions of people with livelihoods, food and nutritional security, and are crucial for employment, economic development, and export earnings in many countries and coastal communities around the world. The status of these important ecosystems and its fisheries resources are however rapidly declining, following decades of unsustainable exploitation patterns, overcapacity, and unsuccessful governance interventions.

Nereus Report 2015: Predicting Future Oceans — Climate Change, Oceans & Fisheries

One of the key objectives of the Nereus Program is to conduct research that contributes to improvements in our understanding of the complex relationships between marine ecosystems, fisheries, ocean governance and global seafood sustainability. In June 2015, the Program released a research report summarizing the main contributions of the numerous projects undertaken by the members of the Nereus Program and its associated colleagues in cross-disciplinary analyses of the global ocean systems. Specifically, this year’s report will discuss global changes that are impacting the marine ecosystems’ seafood production capacity, emerging trends in ocean governance, and socioeconomic changes that are affecting our relationship with the sea.

Download the Predicting Future Oceans — Climate Change, Oceans & Fisheries report