Languages

Rashid Sumaila

PICES International Symposium 2017: Drivers of dynamics of small pelagic resources

The main focus of the 2017 symposium was small pelagic fisheries, which includes species such as herring, capelin, anchovy, sardine, and mackerel. Small pelagic fisheries provide about 25% of the world catch and are important for the socio-economic well-being of many coastal societies. The symposium sessions contributed to the goal of revitalizing international cooperation to develop frameworks addressing issues such as the impacts of climate and fishing pressure on small pelagic populations.

ICES/PICES Symposium on Drivers of Dynamics of Small Pelagic Fish Resources

Nereus Fellow Rebecca Asch will be attending this symposium, which has the goal of revitalizing nternational cooperation on investigations of small pelagic fishes, and developing a framework to address unresolved questions, such as the impact of climate and fishing pressure on the resilience of small pelagic populations.

Climate change-contaminant interactions in marine food webs

This paper proposes that climate change will alter the effects of pollutants in marine food webs by either directly increasing contaminant exposure (for instance due to receding ice caps), or making organisms more vulnerable to other climate change impacts. It discusses two main classes of contaminants that can affect the health of marine organisms: fat-soluble contaminants known as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and protein-binding contaminants such as methylmercury (MeHg).

Scenarios for investigating the future of Canada’s oceans and marine fisheries under environmental and socioeconomic change

Fisheries Economics Research Unit (UBC) Research Associate Louise Teh, Nereus Director of Science William Cheung, and OceanCanada Director and Nereus Research Associate (Honourary) Rashid Sumaila recently had a paper (“Scenarios for investigating the future of Canada’s oceans and marine fisheries under environmental and socioeconomic change“) published in Regional Environmental Change, wherein they review existing methods of scenario analysis (preparing for future response based on multiple potential outcomes) in the marine conservation and fisheries sectors in Canada.

UBC Green College seminar series: “Adapting to Global Changes in Oceans and Fisheries”

This year, the Nereus Program will hold a seminar series with UBC’s Green College on “Adapting to global changes in oceans and fisheries.” This series will consist of seven lectures looking at how ocean changes are affecting environments and people. The first three Fall seminars are listed below, four more will be announced soon. The seminars are all open to the public free of charge and will be held at UBC, at 6201 Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Sustainable management of the high seas could recoup fish stock losses due to climate change

Closing the high seas to fishing could increase fish catches in coastal waters by 10%, compensating for expected losses due to climate change, finds a new Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program study published in Fish and Fisheries.

The high seas are those areas of the ocean outside the jurisdiction of countries; the high seas cover nearly two thirds of the ocean’s surface. These results could be seen by 2050 relative to 2000 and cooperatively managing the high seas fisheries would have similar effects.