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Rebecca Asch

PICES International Symposium 2017: Drivers of dynamics of small pelagic resources

The main focus of the 2017 symposium was small pelagic fisheries, which includes species such as herring, capelin, anchovy, sardine, and mackerel. Small pelagic fisheries provide about 25% of the world catch and are important for the socio-economic well-being of many coastal societies. The symposium sessions contributed to the goal of revitalizing international cooperation to develop frameworks addressing issues such as the impacts of climate and fishing pressure on small pelagic populations.

Invited Lecture at Horn Point Laboratory

Nereus Alumna and Assistant Professor at East Carolina University Rebecca Asch has been invited to speak at at Horn Point Laboratory (HPL), a part of the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science.

ICES/PICES Symposium on Drivers of Dynamics of Small Pelagic Fish Resources

Nereus Fellow Rebecca Asch will be attending this symposium, which has the goal of revitalizing nternational cooperation on investigations of small pelagic fishes, and developing a framework to address unresolved questions, such as the impact of climate and fishing pressure on the resilience of small pelagic populations.

Managing living marine resources in a dynamic environment: The role of seasonal to decadal climate forecasts

Variations in climate lead to fluctuations and changes in fish stocks; they can have effects on such things as fish behaviour, distributions and growth. Because of this, fisheries management has to respond dynamically to these fluctuations. If management decisions are made primarily on past patterns, the negative impacts can be exacerbated, especially with climate change.

From tiny phytoplankton to massive tuna: how climate change will affect energy flows in ocean ecosystems

Phytoplankton are the foundation of ocean life, providing the energy that supports nearly all marine species. Levels of phytoplankton in an ocean area may seem like a good predictor for the amount of fish that can be caught there, but a new study by Nereus Program researchers finds that this relationship is not so straightforward

Climate, Anchovy, and Sardine

According to the FAO, anchovy and sardine made up 13% of global catch in 2012. These small fish are consumed by humans, marine mammals, seabirds, squid, and other fish. They are also used for aquaculture feed, industrial oil, and health supplements. “Climate, Anchovy, and Sardine” a new study in the Annual Review of Marine Science, co-authored by Nereus Alumni Rebecca Asch (Princeton University) and Ryan Rykaczewski (University of South Carolina), reviews the past, present, and future of anchovy and sardine.

Shifting seasonal cycles: Rebecca Asch completes fellowship

In spring, as the plant buds push up through the ground and the days get warmer and longer, the baby salmon fry hatch out of their eggs and start swimming and feeding. At this time, their food – phytoplankton – should also bloom. But due to climate change-induced warming, the fry of many fishes, such as salmon, are coming out earlier or later, as are the phytoplankton blooms, which can cause a mismatch between when the food is available and when the fry need it.

The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Summer Workshop at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

By Rebecca Asch, Senior Nereus Fellow, Princeton University

The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Summer Workshop is an annual event where scientists leading research on the carbon cycle and circulation of nutrients in the ocean meet to discuss advances in their field and jointly plan new research initiatives. This year it was held from July 25 to 28 at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, USA.