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Ryan Rykaczewski

Climate, Anchovy, and Sardine

According to the FAO, anchovy and sardine made up 13% of global catch in 2012. These small fish are consumed by humans, marine mammals, seabirds, squid, and other fish. They are also used for aquaculture feed, industrial oil, and health supplements. “Climate, Anchovy, and Sardine” a new study in the Annual Review of Marine Science, co-authored by Nereus Alumni Rebecca Asch (Princeton University) and Ryan Rykaczewski (University of South Carolina), reviews the past, present, and future of anchovy and sardine.

25 Years of PICES: Celebrating the Past, Imaging the Future annual meeting

From November 2 to 13, the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) held their annual meeting in San Diego, USA. The meeting celebrated the 25th anniversary of PICES with the theme of looking at the past 25 years and imagining the next 25. Some of the topics of interest included coastal ecosystem stressors, loss or changes of marine biodiversity, changing productivity and species distributions in response to climate change, developing outlooks or forecasts of future ocean ecosystems, and examining climate change impacts on ocean ecosystems and human society.

PICES Annual Meeting

Nereus Fellow at Princeton Colleen Petrik will be giving a plenary talk entitled “The Response of Fisheries Production to Natural and Anthropogenic Forcing: Past, Present and Future” at the PICES Annual Meeting in San Diego. The talk presents a mechanistic model to represent immature and mature stages of forage fishes, large pelagic fishes, and large demersal fishes, as well as preliminary of fish biomass under (1) pristine non-anthropogenic historical forcing (no anthropogenic CO2, no fishing), (2) historical climate without fishing, (3) historical climate with fishing, (4) and projected business-as-usual climate and fishing.

7th World Fisheries Congress in Busan, Korea

The Nereus Program is participating in the 7th World Fisheries Congress in Busan, South Korea, including organizing the session “Future of marine fisheries under climate change: Exploring uncertainties, future scenarios…

Ryan Rykaczewski participates in The School on Ocean Climate Modelling

Ryan Rykaczewski, Nereus Program alumnus and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina, recently participated in the “School on Ocean Climate Modeling: Physical and Biogeochemical Dynamics of Semi-Enclosed Seas” in Ankara, Turkey, from September 28 to October 1, as an invited expert on upwelling ecosystems. Additionally, Ryan participated in a CLIVAR workshop on upwelling from October 2 to 3 in Ankara.

CLIVAR workshop on upwelling

Ryan Rykaczewski, Nereus Program alumnus and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina, will participate in a CLIVAR workshop on upwelling from October 2 to 3 in Ankara, Turkey.

Ask an Expert: How will this year’s El Nino affect oceans and fisheries?

Godzilla. Bruce Lee. The names for this year’s El Nino are growing, as are the fears that this might be the biggest one yet. But what is an El Nino and what effects do they have on oceans and fisheries?

Ryan Rykaczewski, Nereus Program alumni and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina, focuses his research on the responses of ecosystem and fisheries production to past and future climate variability and climate change and has published on the impacts of past El Ninos. Here he explains the basics of El Ninos and why this upcoming one could have destructive impacts on ocean ecosystems, fisheries, and fish and mammal species.