Languages

aquaculture

West African fisheries, climate change, and aquaculture: A World Bank and Sub Regional Fisheries Commission workshop

West Africa may be one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change. The region is highly dependent on fisheries for livelihoods and as an important food source. The marine resources of West Africa are currently threatened by overfishing and climate change-induced ocean warming could see fish stocks migrate away from the area and into cooler waters. If CO2 emissions continue at their current levels, the region could see a 50% decline in fisheries-related jobs and a total annual loss of US$311 million, found a study by Nereus Program researchers.

International Conference on Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making

Nereus Director of Science William Cheung was a plenary speaker at the ‘International Conference on Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision-Making’. He discussed the linking of models and scenarios for marine biodiversity and ecosystems to support policies at regional to global scales. Nereus Fellow at UBC Muhammed Oyinlola presented a poster on his project on developing models and scenarios for the future of global mariculture under global change.

Five key aspects of sustainable aquaculture: Can aquaculture help tackle global food security, especially in Africa?

by Muhammed Oyinlola, Nereus Fellow

Aquaculture, the farming of aquatic species, is gradually becoming an important aspect of solving the challenge of global food security. The supply of seafood from fisheries is declining; fish stocks can only be increased if we reduce our fishing pressures, yet governments continue to subsidize the fishing industry for us to fish more. Hence, the open window we have is aquaculture. My argument is that we need to change from hunting in the ocean to farming the oceans just the way we changed hunting on land to producing animal protein by farming. Can aquaculture be our best option to increase the seafood supply for the world’s ever increasing population?

Impacts of climate change on marine fisheries, aquaculture, coastal tourism, and human health: an update

The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), released in 2013 and 2014, highlighted the vulnerability, impacts and adaptation of marine systems to climate change and ocean acidification. As this field of research is constantly building and evolving, “Observed and projected impacts of climate change on marine fisheries, aquaculture, coastal tourism, and human health: an update” was recently published as an update of findings since the release of the report.

COP21: Policy strategies beyond CO2 emission targets

Based on the current trajectory of human-induced impacts on the environment, it is clear that we are pushing the oceans and marine ecosystems to unprecedented limits. Environmental changes in ocean properties have led to an array of ecological responses, from shifts in the composition of the ocean’s phytoplankton to changing distributions of fish species.

In-between Food Security and Sustainability

by Muhammed Oyinlola, Nereus Fellow

Unknowingly to us, we leave remnant wherever we go, a footprint to tell others that “I was here”, the café shop mug with our fingerprint, the lady at the supermarket with our smile, our precious advise to our colleague at work, or our quest to solve other people’s problems (let’s focus on our good sides). However, we do create some problems intentionally or unintentionally. One thing is for sure — we will definitely leave part of us behind, either good or bad.