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biodiversity

Marine Biological Diversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ) PrepCom3 Side Event

The Nereus Program hosted a side event at the 3rd Preparatory Committee Meeting on Marine Biological Diversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ), March 27 to April 7 at the UN Headquarters, in New York. The side event entitled “Adjacency: How legal precedent, ecological connectivity, and traditional knowledge inform our understanding of proximity” was held on April 4.

From quiet meadows to open ocean: why seagrass meadows are important for fisheries

A meadow under the sea? Not to be confused with seaweeds, seagrasses are land plants that have adapted to living their entire lives submerged in saltwater. They are close relatives of terrestrial grasses, seagrasses are thought to have colonized marine environments several millions of years ago. Different species of seagrass are found in tropic and temperate regions around the world from Southeast Asia to Scandinavia and all around North America. They are known as a “foundation species” because they create important habitat for a wide array of other organisms.

GOBI-IKI Workshop on Migratory Connectivity

Nereus Senior Research Fellow Daniel Dunn (Duke) hosted a workshop on global migratory connectivity with the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative (GOBI) and the International Climate Initiative (IKI) February 15 to 17 at Duke University, North Carolina.

UN Convention on Biological Diversity 2016 (COP13)

This year’s conference focused on mainstreaming biodiversity across relevant sectors, especially agriculture, fisheries, forestry, and tourism, to contribute to the sustainable development goals, climate action, food security and other human development goals. Nereus Program researchers participated in expert workshops and drafting groups, and presented at several side events.

PICES Annual Meeting

Nereus Fellow at Princeton Colleen Petrik will be giving a plenary talk entitled “The Response of Fisheries Production to Natural and Anthropogenic Forcing: Past, Present and Future” at the PICES Annual Meeting in San Diego. The talk presents a mechanistic model to represent immature and mature stages of forage fishes, large pelagic fishes, and large demersal fishes, as well as preliminary of fish biomass under (1) pristine non-anthropogenic historical forcing (no anthropogenic CO2, no fishing), (2) historical climate without fishing, (3) historical climate with fishing, (4) and projected business-as-usual climate and fishing.

Aquatic Macroecology Meeting

Nereus Director of Science William Cheung will be giving a keynote entitled “Applying macroecology to project future marine ecosystems under climate change” at the Aquatic Macroecology Meeting of the British Ecological Society.

IPBES Report: Methodological Assessment of Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services

The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) released their Methodological Assessment of Scenarios & Models of Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services, for which Nereus Director of Science William Cheung was a coordinating lead author, as well as a contributing author for Chapter 5 “Modelling consequences of change in biodiversity for nature’s benefits to people” (200-243).