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William Cheung

Impacts World 2017: Counting the true costs of climate change

“The intersectoral and interdisciplinary nature of the ISIMIP approach meant that topics were very broad and spanned both land and sea, natural science, social science, economics, human health, and policy,” said Tyler Eddy. “This perspective was very interesting to consider big ideas and issues at broad scales, however as a result of this broad approach, detailed ocean processes weren’t covered as much.”

Impacts World 2017 Conference

The Impacts World 2017 Conference, intended to address climate-change impacts by bringing together relevant scientists & stakeholders, will take place from October 11 to 13, 2017, at the Kongresshotel Potsdam…

Director of Science William Cheung wins ICES Prix d’Excellence Award

Nereus Director of Science William Cheung has won the Prix d’ Excellence Award by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES). The ​​​​​​​​​​Prix d’Excellence is awarded every three years for a high level of achievement in marine sciences work through research, scientific leadership and scientific policy leadership.

Developing countries face decreases in both fisheries and agriculture production under climate change

The authors looked at how food production on land and in the sea will be threatened by climate change and what the future effects on biodiversity, livelihoods and food security will be. They adopted the human development index (HDI) — a global index of life expectancy, education and per capita income. They found that all of the low human development index countries will face declines in both agriculture and fisheries production by 2050.

Global change in the trophic functioning of marine food webs

The rapid development of fisheries in the 1950’s facilitated declines in predator biomass, overexploitation, collapse of fish stocks, and degradation of marine habitats. A new PLOS ONE paper investigates past changes in trophic functioning of marine ecosystems cause by human-induced changes in species assemblages by applying an ecosystem approach to fisheries.

Adaptive capacity: from assessment to action in coastal social-ecological systems

Coastal ecosystems are undergoing complex changes caused by both social and ecological drivers occurring at varying scales and speeds, which ultimately act as either risks or opportunities to coastal social-ecological systems. The assessment of adaptive capacity of coastal ecosystems is crucial in understanding the extent to which they will be able to accept and adapt to these social and biophysical drivers.